News

Is the Greenland sled dog becoming extinct?

2018.06.08The Greenland sled dog is in danger of becoming extinct. The drastic decline in the population is caused by a decline in the need for hunters to use sled dogs, changes in climate and infectious diseases, and could lead to the extinction of this unique breed, which would substantially affect how the Greenland Inuit use their environment, and in turn could affect health and well-being. Read professor Christian Sonnes Letter in Science here: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6393/1080.1.full

Voltage loss in cable bacteria

2018.05.08An international research group has shed new light on cable bacteria. Using laser light, researchers have followed electrons as they travel through the current-conducting bacteria, and on the basis of the electrical potential in the bacteria, they have calculated that the bacteria because of voltage loss cannot function efficiently at depths exceeding 3 cm into the sediment.

[Translate to English:] Ellen Rose Jacobs wants to work in bioacoustics research when she graduates. Photo: Melissa Yildirim

International student: Bioscience is world-class in marine bioacoustics

2018.05.03Every year hundreds of international students travel to Aarhus University to study. One of them is Ellen Rose Jacobs from California, USA. She is studying her Master’s degree in Biology at the Department of Bioscience because she wanted to work with and learn from researchers who are at the forefront of their fields.

ST to consolidate Aarhus activities on campus and at Katrinebjerg

2018.05.03The framework for Aarhus University's physical development in the years ahead was presented at a mass meeting on 2 May 2018. For ST, this means that, after a long wait, the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics will be consolidated in University City; it means moving from Kalø and Silkeborg and gathering life-science activities in the University Park; and it means that engineers will all be together at Katrinebjerg and in the Science Park.

Increase of plant species on mountain tops is accelerating with global warming

2018.04.05Over the past 10 years, the number of plant species on European mountain tops has increased by five-times more than during the period 1957-66. Data on 302 European peaks covering 145 years shows that the acceleration in the number of mountain-top species is unequivocally linked to global warming.

Oil-eating microbes are challenged in the Arctic

2018.03.09Bacteria play a major role in cleaning up oil spills and mitigating its environmental impacts. In a review published in ‘Science of the Total Environment’, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, examine the major limiting factors for microbial degradation in Arctic environments.

Post.doc. Alberto Scoma
PhD student Søren Dollerup Nielsen

Funding for two new ’underground’ programmes at Bioscience

2018.03.07Geomicrobiologists from Department of Bioscience have received funding for two new research programmes from Danish Hydrocarbon Research Centre. Read more about the projects here.

Maize fields entice geese to winter in Denmark

2018.03.05More and more geese remain in Denmark for the winter. They forage in the growing number of maize fields all over the country. Researchers warn that, in the long term, the many geese may cause problems for agriculture.

Blue mussels have an important role in coastal ecosystems and are a key indicator for climate change, which is why scientists are studying where and how they survive along the Greenland coast today. From the left: Susse Wegeberg and Jakob Thyrring from the Arctic Research Centre, Denmark, Martin E. Blicher from the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, and Jozef Wiktor Jr. from the Polish Academy of Sciences. Photo: Kristine Engel Arendt

Climate Change draws invasive species to the Arctic

2018.03.01Warmer temperatures and declining sea ice pulls foreign animals and plants to the Arctic, with drastic consequences for these sensitive ecosystems.

Kate Sprogis (from the left), Jakob Thyrring, Karine Heraah and Maria Lund Paulsen have received the four new Marie Curie fellowships at the Department of Bioscience. Privat photos

The Department of Bioscience is leading with four Marie Curie fellowships

2018.03.01The Department of Bioscience is the leading department in achieving Marie-Curie fellowships in 2017. Meet the Department's four new, young research talents here.

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