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Monitoring of Danish orchids

Orchid Database: Monitoring of Danish orchids

In Denmark, 37 species, 10 subspecies and 4 varieties of orchids are recognised. Monitoring of orchids and their habitats started back in 1943. Here, Buderupholm National Forest District started a census of the location of lady’s slipper orchids (cypripedium calceolus). In 1982, monitoring of other species began. Since then, 42 wild Danish orchids have been monitored for shorter or longer periods, contingent upon e.g. changes of habitats or the disappearance of the populations.

The species that are prevalent in most parts of the country are monitored at selected locations, while most of the species that are only known at 10 or less locations are monitored at virtually all growing sites.

Orchids are protected, which means that the plants must not be damaged or dug up, and that their seeds may not be collected. On the other hand, it is ok to observe them in nature and photograph them in their habitats. Some orchids place high demands on their growing site and have a complicated cohabitation with fungi. This means that they have limited distribution, as they are linked to specific soil conditions and thus have few habitats. For other species, specific soil conditions are less important, so they are prevalent in most parts of the country.

The orchids in Denmark can be seen on the orchard list, and it is possible to see a list of locations where the orchid in question is or has been monitored. In addition, each orchid species has a separate page about its monitoring status.

The history

Monitoring of orchids and their habitats started in 1943, when Buderupholm National Forest District began a census of the location of lady’s slippers orchids (cypripedium calceolus). In 1982, monitoring of other species began. Since then, 45 wild Danish orchids have been monitored for shorter or longer periods, contingent upon e.g. changes of habitats or the disappearance of the populations.

The species that are prevalent in most parts of the country are monitored at selected locations, while most of the species that are known at 10 or less locations are monitored at virtually all growing sites.

Orchids are protected, which means that the plants must not be damaged or dug up, and that their seeds may not be collected. On the other hand, it is ok to observe them in nature. Some orchids place high demands on their growing site and have a complicated cohabitation with fungi. Other species can grow in different locations and are prevalent in most parts of the country.

When you activate one of the Danish species names on the orchid, list, you will find a list of locations where the orchid in question has been monitored. When the name of a location is activated, a column chart will appear showing the annual counts.

Redlisted orchids

21 out of 46 orchids, i.e. 45%, are redlisted. This means that they have either disappeared (3 orchids), are critically endangered (3 orchids), moderately endangered (8 orchids) or vulnerable (7 orchids). Search The Danish Red List’s website.